Out of Small Things

The youth theme for 2021 is D&C 64:33-34:

“Wherefore, be not weary in well-doing for ye are laying the foundation of a great work. And out of small things proceedeth that which is great. Behold, the Lord requireth the heart and a willing mind and the willing and the obedient shall eat the good of the land of Zion in these last days.”

The church announced that this scripture was picked because of how it relates to President Nelson’s youth devotional from 2018. I loved that devotional. It resonated with me. In the past I’ve thought it would be neat to write a song for the youth theme but I had other projects and a busy life 🙂 So, when this theme was announced, I felt a strong desire to write a song to go with it. I submitted it to the church but I’m not really expecting anything.

I studied and emulated some pop songs that I think youth (and I) like these days. I hoped to achieve and fun but spiritual mix.

Out of Small Things (PDF)

Verse 1
So much good can happen in our lives
When we give our heart and have a willing mind,
Weed out wasteful time from the day,
Counsel with the Lord as we pray.

Pre-chorus
The world has been scattered. Our call is to gather.
Anyone can receive The blessings only the gospel brings.

Chorus
Out of small things will proceed what’s great
As I sacrifice a little each day.
The Lord will always provide a way
For hearts to open and lives to change.
For hearts to open and lives to change.

Verse 2
A battalion has formed. Will you enlist?
This moment’s one to not be missed.
We’ll step away from worldly distractions.
Replace it with Christlike actions.

Pre-chorus/Chorus

Bridge
There is no more important cause.
Zion will flourish because
The stone’s rolling forward. Nothing can stop it.
Our duty is clear as revealed by the prophet:

Pre-chorus (Revised)
The world has been scattered.
Our call is to gather.
We’ll help all to receive
The blessings only the gospel brings.

Chorus

In Humility Our Savior, Jesus Once of Humble Birth Piano Solo

It has been a while since I put out a piano solo. In a comment on my site, a woman named Sheri said, “I love all your piano solos arrangements of church songs. Have any more? Or are you busy Momming? 😁”

It was seriously that comment that put me in front of the piano to write this. I thought, “Wow, someone actually wants more of my arrangements.” I was really touched.

I picked my favorite sacrament hymns and a few months later, it was done!

PDF: In Humility Our Savior/Jesus Once Of Humble Birth

In this video you can hear my kids in the background. It just shows how I write my songs and that’s just life these days. I love it and am grateful for it!

When I Let Him Inside

See the source image

When I wrote a hymn version of this last year, the whole time I was imagining beautiful piano with it. I finally have that completed!

I actually started writing this song as a primary song (knocking would be such a great action for singing time!) but realized the topic seemed deeper. So, I changed it to a hymn. The lyrics in the chorus still sound simple like a primary song but sometimes we as adults need to hear that.

I feel like the main talk I used for this was one by Sharon Eubank from April 2019 General Conference. She talked about times when we need to draw to the Savior and how we do that. The concepts from that talk relate to so many people in so many different situations. I hope this song speaks in a similar way.

When I Let Him Inside Soprano (PDF)

When I Let Him Inside Alto (PDF)

I wish I had a real recording with a better voice than mine (and me playing all the right notes ) because this song has become so special to me. Maybe someday…

When I Let Him Inside

The Savior stands knocking.
O come, ye weary soul,
Come, those with questions,
And those with scarlet wool.
When paths fill with darkness
And doubting clouds my sight
Faithful prayers transform my view.
I feel heaven’s light.
Help my eyes to see, my ears to hear,
My heart to open wide
That I might feel the peace that comes
When I let Him inside.

The Savior stands knocking.
I come to Him in steps.
Each one will carry
Eternal consequence.
Though efforts feel awkward
And weakness slows my stride
When my gaze is lifted up
Promises ignite.
Help my eyes to see, my ears to hear,
My heart to open wide
That I might feel the peace that comes
When I let Him inside.

By op’ning to Jesus
My burdens will be light,
Deep wounds have healing,
And crimson sins turn white.
With ongoing action,
Delaying change no more,
Cheerful courage I will take;
Blessings are assured.
Help my eyes to see, my ears to hear,
My heart to open wide
That I might feel the peace that comes
When I let the Savior inside.

Turn Your Hearts

Here is a jubilant arrangement of Hymn 291 in Hymnplicity style. I’ve even created a paper to give to choir members to use with their hymn books. Or, just print out the 4 pages and give that to choir members 🙂

When our stake choir director asked if I could arrange the song “Turn Your Hearts”, I was so excited. Whenever I’m working on a project to help a chorister, I always finish it quickly and it usually turns out pretty good. This time was no exception.

The cool thing was that our stake conference was in the Alpine Tabernacle. It is a grand and beautiful place. It was so fun to perform the song there!

I was grateful to work on a song about family history. The lyrics have gone through my mind since I’ve been working on it and it has inspired me to focus more on it.

Turn Your Hearts, SATB and Piano (pdf)

Turn Your Hearts, Choir Insert (pdf)

Build a Fortress

Build a Fortress (pdf)

About the Inspiration:

The Church Submission Guidelines for the new Children’s Songbook suggested music to be written “in more modern or culturally varied styles.” I pondered this and felt a song with an African/Caribbean feel would be perfect. I listened to a few songs in that genre. I discovered two elements: a strong (fun!) beat and lyric repetition.

For months I couldn’t figure out how to create that or what subject to use. With two weeks until the July 1st deadline, I felt heaven was unlocked. First, I heard the spirit speak to my mind, “Go to Elder Rasband’s talk.” I had thought to look at that a few weeks prior but after reading it, I didn’t come up with anything. When the spirit spoke to me again I was more earnest and shortly after that, I came up with a super catchy chorus.

For me, two weeks is not a lot of time to write a song. I have four kids (ages 10, 8, 5 and 2) and a crazy supportive husband. I wanted to make a conscious effort to still give them the attention they needed.

I prayed, pleading, with Heavenly Father that if I gave them all the love they needed that he would consecrate my limited time on the piano. With summer break in full swing I made sure to help my kids with their new routines, take them to their activities and be there for them. While it did pain me slightly, one night I just sat next to my husband on the couch while he did some work on the lap top because I felt he needed me just to be there.

I know that because I did the important work first, I was blessed with inspiration more than is actually within me.

About the Lyrics:

I specifically didn’t want to list out the ways to build a fortress. There are too many! Also, this is exactly what the new singing time is supposed to be about: learn a song with discussion within. Each child can suggest their own ways using the lyrics as inspiration. How fun would it be to put their ideas on Lincoln Logs or on a picture of a fortress having them build it up their own fortress.

In the 2nd verse I wanted I wanted to make sure to say prophets (plural) because I read a sharing time from 2001 where they used the watchman metaphor and used all the apostles and prophets. Even though President Nelson has been teaching a lot about repentance, the last line “Repent each day” is more meant to mean that after they have heard the prophets’ words they repent of the things they have done wrong, being inspired from the words they have heard.

In the 3rd verse I was trying to condense home/family into one. Again, I didn’t want to just say everything you do in the home, that’s too much. I also didn’t want to say a line like “listen to your parents they know what’s best.” Kids would roll their eyes. The idea of teaching doctrine fixes that. Hence the first line, “Parents have a sacred trust to protect and watch over us.” Much better!

The next part of the 3rd verse I wanted to touch the parents just as much, if not more, than the children. “They seek guidance from the Lord. Watch their example. Heed their words.” I hope parents hear that and think, “I need to pray for my children more or better. That’s my duty.” Then the real kicker to “watch their example.” If we want our children to be good, we have to be an example of righteous behavior ourselves.

Conclusion:

This song was put together piece by piece. I wrote out sooooo many melodies before finding the right ones. The left hand was just as tricky. There’s a reason why even though you want them, fast/fun primary songs are fewer in number than slow/beautiful songs–they are hard to write!

Also, a big thanks to my friend Melanie for meeting me last minute to review my draft. This music is rhythmically advanced and I needed a sanity check.

My Savior, A Song About Death

I follow the Primary Music Leaders facebook page. I noticed a few discussions about what to do/sing when someone in the ward passed away (a child or parent especially). I was thinking how it would be so nice to have a song that addressed this situation. Sure, there are songs that brush the topic but it’s such a big part of life I felt it needed it’s own song.

I have had very little experience with death. For that reason I felt I shouldn’t write this song. But the prompting was strong. I told my husband Sunday morning of the October 2018 General Conference about my prompting. I said, “If there is a talk about death, I will know for sure I need to write a song about this.” First talk of that morning was President Ballard’s talk, “The Vision of the Redemption of the Dead.” Heavenly Father blessed me with reassurance.

I started off trying to write about what happens when a person dies. Shortly after doing this I was stumped. I prayed about it. Later I had an impression to focus the song on the Savior. No wonder I wasn’t being inspired. Without the Savior, there would be no hope associated with death. The sting of death would be unbearable. Reading Doctrine & Covenants 138, as suggested by Elder Ballard, I found my chorus in verses 23-24: “And the saint rejoiced in their redemption, and bowed the knee and acknowledged the Son of God as their Redeemer and Deliverer from death and the chains of hell. Their countenances shone, and the radiance from the presence of the Lord rested upon them, and they sang praises unto his holy name.” That was a good place to start.

My first draft was about how people feel sorrow but, there’s Christ, so all will be OK. I felt like it was insensitive. I read articles and listened to people about their experiences. Some people who experienced the death of someone close said people would tell them they must be so grateful for the Savior and not address their grief. I really wanted to rewrite the lyrics to validate that everyone experiences a wide range of sad emotions: grief, sorrow, loneliness, anger, confusion while still manifesting the hope of Christ.

Let’s say to get that idea across took a lot of work. But every times I came up with something that worked, I was elated! I finished the song the week before April 2019 General Conference. At conference President Nelson spoke about people who refuse to receive essential ordinances. He said, “while there is a place for them hereafter–with wonderful men and women who also chose not to make covenants with God–that is not the place where families will be reunited and given the privilege to live and progress forever.”

The second verse to my song says, “While I have time on earth I will keep God’s commands. For I want to return to heaven and be with my loved one again.” Having previously written this line, and hearing President Nelson’s words, I felt the spirit guided me to hit that nail on the head. We must do our part to be with our loved one again and Christ will make up for what we lack. He is risen. He atoned for our sins. Because of Him we can be with our loved ones again but we need to do our part.

My Savior (pdf)

My Savior (A song about death)

When my loved one departs
And on earth I remain
Do I feel loneliness or anger?
Am I wrong to feel so much pain?
If I turn my thoughts to the Savior,
Who knows all my sorrow and grief,
His peace will come as I ask
The spirit to comfort me.

My knee shall bow for my Savior, Redeemer.
My lips shall sing His praise.
He dries my tears and gives me hope
That life goes beyond the grave.

While I have time on earth
I will keep God’s commands.
For I want to return to heaven
And be with my loved one again.
So I’ll turn my thoughts to the Savior,
Atoning for all who would live.
This great vicar’ous gift brings
Deliv’rence from death and sin.

My knee shall bow for my Savior, Redeemer.
My lips shall sing His praise.
He dries my tears and gives me hope
That life goes beyond the grave.

My Covenants

I was reading a talk suggested by a Relief Society instructor: “A Sin Resistant Generation” by Joy D. Jones. One phrase struck me: “There is unusual power in making and keeping covenants with our Heavenly Father. The adversary knows this, so he has obscured the concept of covenant making.”

I thought, “If Satan wants children to be confused about what covenants are then I’m going to write a song about that. A song to help children remember what covenants are. ‘ I Will Not Forget My Covenants’ is what I should call it.”

I came up with the first verse very quickly. When it came time for a chorus I really wanted to be inspired so I took it to the temple. While sitting in the chapel, waiting for a session to start, I opened The Book of Mormon with full belief that I would find my answer. I flipped opened to Alma chapter 31. In verse 36 it mentioned that Alma “clapped his hands upon all them.” He gave these people the Holy Ghost (an ordinance, associated with baptism). Then in verse 38 it says, “And the Lord provided for them…and he also gave them strength, that they should suffer no manner of afflictions, save it were swallowed up in the joy of Christ.”

There have been many songs about Christ but none where I heard that phrase, “joy of Christ.” It is so beautiful. I almost felt that the phrase was written just for me. In further searching, it is the only place in all scriptures where that exact phrase is used.

When I took this song to an editor, my heart was elated when he told me when I sang the part of this song where there is a pause between the lyrics, “I will not forget” and “my covenants” he thought, “Wait, what am I not supposed to forget? Oh, my covenants.” That is exactly what I wanted! Hopefully children will pause to wonder (and always remember) the same thing.

The 2nd and 3rd verse came so easily I knew I had heaven’s help.

Thus, this song was born.

My Covenants (pdf)

This recording has a few different lyrics. I will update the video soon.

A cov’nant is a promise, a promise that I make
With my Heav’nly Father on my baptism day
I promise to serve and keep God’s commands.
Great blessings await on the covenant path.

Chours:
I’ll feel the joy of Christ enter into my life.
Eternity’s real. My cup is filled
When I don’t forget my covenants.

Sometimes I stray from the path
But true repentance brings
Sins that wash away and leave my hands pure and clean.
As I take the bread and water each week
I’ll cleave to the Savior and he’ll strengthen me.

Chorus

When I enter the temple I’ll find myself prepared
To keep greater cov’nants that I’ll be making there.
The light I receive will give me great strength
To make righteous choices and reach up with faith.

Chorus

One Little Sheep

I wanted to write a primary song that was good for nursery/junior primary: repetitive lyrics and actions that easily go with the lyrics. This tune and these lyrics came to my head one day. I have always loved the imagery of Jesus as the Good Shephard so it made sense that this is what I came up with 🙂

I love that while the music is simple, the message is inspiring. Making it applicable for senior primary too!

Sheet music: One Little Sheep

Composing Tip: 6/8 Timing Notation

I’ve mentioned before that I’m not a music major so this post is for people like me who don’t know all the technicalities with music writing!

I recently learned a little about notating in 6/8 time. When writing out music in this time signature think about which notes are often being emphasized: 1 and 4. It has a feeling of 2 sets of triplets. So when writing out music, a half note is never used. If you did have 4 beats for one note you divide it by having a dotted quarter note tied to an eighth note if it is at the beginning of the measure, or an eighth note tied to a dotted quarter note if it was the last 4 beats of the measure–breaking it up 3 eighth notes by 3 eighth notes.

Here is an example from my “Have I Done Any Good?/Love One Another Medley”:

See how I have 4 beats but tied them together so the measure is divided by three beats? It helps for reading the music and counting out the rhythm. Think about it 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. You paused a little after the 3 didn’t you?

This is my new discovery. Hope this helps you too!